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Rock climbing in Kalymnos, Greece

Route rebolting to begin in Kalymnos later this year


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Arhi_Winter_ClimbKalymnos
 
After the coldest, rainiest, windiest winter in recent memory, the weather in Kalymnos has done an about-face and now the sun shines bright and (too) warm. The season seems to start off with lots of climbers, Masouri is out of hibernation and a couple of new mini-markets and restaurants have popped up, though not much else has changed. But there’s also really good news on the rebolting front this year.
 
The good news is that funding for an official rebolting project has been approved and will be implemented in Kalymnos later this year. After many years of emergency route maintenance done by volunteers, this year funding through a proper EU program will be provided via a local contractor to use primarily towards route rebolting and additionally toward some new routing. Works will start in the summer and must be completed by the end of the year. Overseeing the project will be Aris Theodoropoulos alongside a team of other qualified, experienced equippers, including members of the Kalymnos Rescue Service.
 
For the record, the last official rebolting program was nearly five years ago, so to say it’s long overdue is an understatement. This year’s rebolting program is described in more detail below.
 
 
The specifics
 
The Kalymnos rebolting project comes with the following specifications:
 
• 2400 stainless-steel glue-in bolts (316L, 12mm) are to be used for rebolting existing routes
• 500 V-type anchors with two opposed carabiners are to replace older lower-offs
• 580 carabiners are to be placed on anchors without carabiners or used to replace worn carabiners
• 100 new routes are to be equipped using stainless-steel bolts (316L, 12mm) and V-type anchors with two opposed carabiners
• Some roadside crag markers/signposts will be added
• All parts of the rebolting/equipping program must be completed by the end of 2015.
 
Maintenance_Rockland_ClimbKalymnos
 
 
Thinking long-term
 
No doubt this rebolting program is a very good thing for Kalymnos, but it will only help to rebolt about 10% of the total routes. And the fact is that funds for rebolting are almost non-existent. Now, more than ever, we must work for the longevity of Kalymnos; besides correcting the routes in need, future climbing development must be done the right way to ensure that Kalymnos remains one of the safest family climbing destinations in the world.
 
To this end, a collaboration is underway between the Greek Federation of Mountaineering and Climbing, the Hellenic Mountain Guides Association and Climb Kalymnos, to put together a set of official guidelines for equipping sport routes all over Greece. They will be largely based on these principles. The goal is to provide some structure and quality control, because when new routing is left completely unchecked, as it has been over the last few years, many new routes in Greece and Kalymnos end up poorly-protected or equipped with inappropriate materials which become corroded after a matter of months or a couple of years (i.e. homemade bolts, bolts with no certification or bolts by unreliable manufacturers, to name a few). Effective sometime next year, this set of guidelines will be proposed for all new sport routes in Greece. Perhaps not a perfect solution, but in the absence of funds and resources for rebolting it is a step in the right direction.
 
Starting with the Kalymnos rebolting project this year is something of a transition, the goal being to “tidy up” as many existing routes as possible and to slow down haphazard new routing. So if you were planning to equip new routes on Kalymnos this year, may we suggest that you put your new routes on hold and devote your time to checking your older routes instead. If their materials, bolting or cleaning need improvement, please correct them.
 
Not everybody will agree; but to those who do, we would like to say that everybody involved in route maintenance, rebolting and rescue on Kalymnos greatly appreciates your understanding and cooperation.

This entry was posted on Monday, April 13th, 2015 at 23:04 and is filed under Kalymnos news. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can skip to the end and leave a response. Pinging is currently not allowed.


42 Responses to “Route rebolting to begin in Kalymnos later this year”

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  1. Aris says:

    Hi Pawel,

    No, unfortunately we do not know when the rebolting will be done yet. For the moment, the whole project is temporarily “frozen” due to the latest Greek crisis problems. We hope it can start from day to day. When the rebolting does start on “Wings” and “Wild Country” we will close all the south face of Telendos (including “Eterna”) and notify climbers well in advance.

    Aris

  2. Pawel says:

    Ok lads . Do any of you know when rebolting on wild country and wings for life will be done ? Any chance to climb one of them in September ? Is eterna safe to climb during revolting of wild and wings ?
    Thanks

  3. Bruno says:

    dear John … you write:
    “I’ve come to realize you are an ignorant and obnoxious moron who should have no part to play in determining the future of climbing on Kalymnos, or anywhere.”

    what anger, and why? Only because I say that your speech is not absolute truth

    for my part, because you write “NONE of those links are “my” links” … I will stop the dialogue with a liar (I promise this is my last message to you) …
    A liar … because the links I give are related to your name for the first,(clic on “John Byrnes” sends to climbcaymanbrac)
    The second link (titanclimbing.com) is the link given at the bottom of the climbcaymanbrac page: (“Note 2104: at this time the titanium Eterna bolt can be purchased at Titan Climbing”) … the link sends to http://www.titanclimbing.com/

    So after you may well say anything … you are no more credible than me to decide the Kalymnos equipment … And I continue to say that your messages are pro titanium lobby not only for safety at 100%

  4. Francis Haden says:

    Stainless steel can be either be passive or active and this can occur within the same grade of stainless steel. It does not have to be solely confined to the more common situation of SS304 mixed with SS
    316. Eg a 316 hanger combined with a 316 bolt. Differential oxidation can occur around the bolt / hanger interface where the hanger remains passive and the bolt, due to machining and work hardening, and therefore reduced corrosion resistance, may revert to its active state resulting in pitting of the bolt.

  5. John Byrnes says:

    Bruno, NONE of those photos, that you call mine, are mine. NONE of those links are “my” links. Two are links to the UIAA, one to the British Mountain Club and one to Climbing magazine. If you think you know more than the UIAA, then perhaps you should offer your ‘expertise’ to them.

    And I’ll say again, I have NO business connections to any titanium producers beyond being a customer.

    I’ve come to realize you are an ignorant and obnoxious moron who should have no part to play in determining the future of climbing on Kalymnos, or anywhere.

  6. Bruno says:

    I no longer try to persuade you … but I continue to assert that your links are not “the” evidence, and no more your assertions! Also that you have a business lobby approach about titanium and your terrifying pictures of broken bolts are also questionable
    You are like the religious, convinced of your truth … good luck man!

  7. John Byrnes says:

    “One final note mister Byrnes … and I leave you to your titanium religion
    you do not answer the question (that exposes the problem of choosing between titanium and stainless steel)

    If stainless steel is so bad that you claim … why metal parts on sailboats are stainless steel, not titanium ???? Strange !!!”

    Bruno, with this question you prove that you have no understanding of the issue at all. In other words, you prove your ignorance. If you had read some of the links that have been posted here, you wouldn’t need to ask that question. It shouldn’t be a language barrier because this information is available in many languages. Or is it that you lack the mental ability to understand what you read?

    THE SIMPLE ANSWER IS: Boats live in seawater. Bolts live in limestone. If you put stainless steel on a boat, either in or out of the water, it should be fine for the life of the boat. You put the same stainless steel in a hole in limestone and wait 10 years, it will crack (as has been observed world-wide).

  8. Bruno says:

    One final note mister Byrnes … and I leave you to your titanium religion
    you do not answer the question (that exposes the problem of choosing between titanium and stainless steel)

    If stainless steel is so bad that you claim … why metal parts on sailboats are stainless steel, not titanium ???? Strange !!!!

  9. John Byrnes says:

    “It was already explain that this web site is only a publicity for the titane business … And that some photos where a fake !
    Please, put titane on the rock if you want but stop this lobby ! Titane is à good solution but not the only one, even in sea environment inox is also perfect if you put the good inox”

    Bruno, you are an ignorant, slandering liar. You have no background or qualifications to be saying the things you are saying. If you want to accuse Martin of faking a photo, provide proof or shut up.

    The UIAA, the BMC and many other credible organizations have published proof that Stainless bolts are not appropriate in seaside limestone. You have NO PROOF, just ignorance. SO PLEASE SHUT UP and let the grown-ups talk.

    http://theuiaa.org/upload_area/files/1/Bolt_failures_on_Sea_Cliffs.pdf

    http://theuiaa.org/news-865–Safety-Commission-issues-update-of-corrosion-notice-for-anchors-in-marine-locations-.html

    https://www.thebmc.co.uk/uiaa-issue-anchor-corrosion-warning

    http://www.climbing.com/climber/built-to-last/

  10. Bruno says:

    It was already explain that this web site is only a publicity for the titane business … And that some photos where a fake !
    Please, put titane on the rock if you want but stop this lobby ! Titane is à good solution but not the only one, even in sea environment inox is also perfect if you put the good inox

  11. climber says:

    I think too, that titanium bolts will make much more sense in the long run in such a corrosive environment, being close to the sea

    Check this out:

    http://www.titanclimbing.com/why.html

  12. Emanuele says:

    @ Joshua: There is no interest to me to promote anything that it’s not working properly, because, as I wrote before, I am a climber and a bolt seller, but mainly a climber; there is a real chance that I get a whipper on a a bad bolt, so I am more concerned about safety rather than selling.

    Marine: as far concerning my investigations, that can be wrong, there is a “bit of confusion” going on about the term “Marine”.
    Example: “Marine” from a spanish supplier is 1,4404 (316L). “Marina” from an Italian supplier is 1,4404 with particular treatment, which according to them, will increase durability. The word “Marine” from me does not exist, but I sell 1,4404, which the Spanish supplier will sell and market it as “Marine”. What I told to Toni, and what I told to the people living in Kalymnos to shom I spoke with, and what I wrote before in this topic, is that there is no permanent solution in marine conditions. The bolts can stay in place, but resin might give up OR a whole piece of rock collapse in your face. What I am suggesting to anybody ask me what “I would do” is simple:
    – Bolt with 1,4529 expansion bolts. M10. These should last +25 years anywhere. No chemicals/ glue ins.
    – use hangers and belays in A4 (there is not real difference between 316 and 316L except hype), with stamped year or production/equipment, to be replaced/inspected each 10 years.
    – Each 10 years, inspect the whole route for safety /rock).

    I do not suggest 12 mm bolts, I have a few photos in my forum and I have explained (in Italian), why at the present stage using M12 bolts is a bad idea. Evidence of +25 years of falling, suggest me I am damn right.
    http://kinobi.forumup.it/about332-kinobi.html

    Finally, I have expressed to the people that probably will rebolt Kalymnos with EU funds, that using 316L glue ins (chemicals) is a bad idea, but this is what was in the specs done according by a burocrat in Brussels (which was clearly tipped for specification by somebody).

    Ciao,
    E

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